Don’t let the government get in the way of your mission: 3 stories from today’s New York Times

A doctor(s), an engineer, and a poet were highlighted in different stories in today’s New York Times. The three were activists in different ways, proceeding with their chosen missions despite apparent obstacles such as government, regulations, and public opinion.

This is a short posting of good news.

Doctors without borders  Doctors Without Borders Evolves as It Forms the Vanguard in Ebola Fight. The New York Times, October 11, 2014, pA6.

“The group emerged in the late 1960s, as Nigerian forces fought a secessionist struggle in Biafra. When the government refused to allow some young French Red Cross doctors to deliver food to the famine-strien rebel territories, they revolted, breaking their Red Cross Pledge of neutrality and silence.

They founded the group that would, in 1971, become Medecins Sans Frontieres. Its first director, Dr. Bernard Kouchner, a media-savvy leftist who would become France’s foreign minister, described the mission: “It’s simple.Go where the patients are.”

Medical teams would tend to people wherever they suffered, regardless of political or military boundaries, with or without permission. The group’s workers would bear public witness to what they observed.

Today, Doctors Without Bordersis the largest of the relatively few organizations devoted to providing urgent care in medical crises caused by armed conflict or natural disasters..”

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Kailash satyarthis nobel prize caps decades of fighting child slavery in India. The New York Times, October 11, 2014, pA10

Kailish Satyarthi, one of the 2 recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, has worked for 3 decades to stop child slavery in India, using undercover operatives and camera crews to physically free children, on site, from enforced work in deplorable conditions. The organization he founded, Bachpan Bachao Andolan (Save the Children Mission) has freed 70,000 children.

“Born about six and a half years after India won independence, Mr. Satyarthi, 60, was so deeply impressed with Gandhi’s teachings that, as a teenager, he invited a group of high-caste local bigwigs to a meal prepared by low-caste “untouchables”: the ivied guests boycotted the event and then shunned his family. Deeply upset, the boy dropped his Brahmin family name in favor of Satyarthi, which mean “seeker of truth,” according to an account on his website.

A few years later, Mr Satyarthi was studying engineering at college when Indira Gandhi declared a state of emergency, cracking down on civil liberties and suspending elections. Already a Marxist, he mobilized students against the government and spent much of the period avoiding arrest warrants, said Prabhat Kumar, a longtime friend and fellow activist.”

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Carolyn Kizer, Pulitzer-Winning Poet, Dies at 89. The New York TImes, October 11, 2014, p A19.

And last, the obituary for poet Carolyn Kizer, whose poetry was personal, intellectual, and political.

“Ms. Kizer’s politics were not confined to paper. In 1998, for instance, she and Maxine Kumin resigned as chancellors of the Academy of American Poets to protest the lack of women and minority group members in its leadership. The organization has since diversified as a result.”

 

Ms. Kizer’s first collection, “The Ungrateful Garden,” published in 1961, left little doubt that to her, the poetical was the political. In a poem from the volume, “The Death of a Public Servant,” about McCarthyism, she wrote:

This is a day when good men die from windows,

Leap from a sill of one of the world’s eyes

Into the blind and deaf-and-dumb of time …

Dead friends, who were the servants of this world!

Once there was a place for gentle heroes.

Now they are madmen who, scuttling down corridors,

Eluding guards, climb lavatory walls

And squeeze through air-vents to their liberation.

 

 

 

 

 

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