Archive | war

Can climate survive adherence to war and partisanship? By David Swanson

Can the Climate Survive Adherence to War and Partisanship?

By David Swanson
http://davidswanson.org/node/5448
For the past decade, the standard procedure for big coalition rallies and marches in Washington D.C. has been to gather together organizations representing labor, the environment, women’s rights, anti-racism, anti-bigotry of all sorts, and a wide array of liberal causes, including demands to fund this, that, and the other, and to halt the concentration of wealth.

At that point, some of us in the peace movement will generally begin lobbying the PEP (progressive except for peace) organizers to notice that the military is swallowing up enough money every month to fund all their wishes 100 times over for a year, that the biggest destroyer of the natural environment is the military, that war fuels and is fueled by racism while stripping our rights and militarizing our police and creating refugees.

When we give up on trying to explain the relevance of our society’s biggest project to the work of reforming our society, we generally point out that peace is popular, that it adds a mere 5 characters to a thousand-word laundry list of causes, and that we can mobilize peace groups to take part if peace is included.

Often this works. Several big coalition efforts have eventually conceded and included peace in some token way in their platforms. This success is most likely when the coalition’s organizing is most democratic (with a small d). So, Occupy, obviously, ended up including a demand for peace despite its primary focus on a certain type of war profiteers: bankers.

Other movements include a truly well informed analysis with no help from any lobbying that I’ve had to be part of. The Black Lives Matter platform is better on war and peace than most statements from the peace movement itself. Some advocates for refugees also seem to follow logic in opposing the wars that create more refugees.

Other big coalition actions simply will not include any preference for peace over war. This seems to be most likely to happen when the organizations involved are most Democratic (with a capital D). The Women’s March backs many other causes, but uses the word peace without suggesting any preference for peace: “We work peacefully while recognizing there is no true peace without justice and equity for all.” There is also, one might note, no justice or equity for anybody living under bombs.

Here’s a coalition currently trying to decide whether it dare say the word peace: https://peoplesclimate.org.

This group is planning a big march for the climate and many other unrelated causes, such as the right to organize unions, on April 29. Organizers claim some relationship among all the causes. But, of course, there isn’t really an obvious direct connection between protecting the climate and protecting gay rights or the rights of workers. They may all be good causes and all involve kindness and humility, but they can be won separately or together.

Peace is different. One cannot, in fact, protect the climate while allowing the military to drain away the funding needed for that task, dumping it into operations that consume more petroleum than any other and which lead the way in poisoning water, land, and air. Nor can a climate march credibly claim, as this one does, to be marching for “everything we love” and refuse to name peace, unless it loves war or is undecided between or uninterested in the benefits of mass murder versus those of nonviolent cooperation.

Here’s a petition you can sign to gently nudge the People’s Climate March in the right direction. Please do so soon, because they’re making a decision.

The struggle to save the climate faces other hurdles in addition to loyalty to militarism. I mean, beyond the mammoth greed and corruption and misinformation and laziness, there are other unnecessary handicaps put in place even by those who mean well. A big one is partisanship. When Republicans have finally proposed a carbon tax, many on the left simply won’t consider it, won’t even tackle the problem of making it actually work fairly and honestly and aggressively enough to succeed. Perhaps because some of the supporters seem untrustworthy. Or perhaps because some of the supporters likely don’t believe you need labor unions in order to tax carbon.

And which ones would you need, the ones advocating for more pipelines or the ones working in other fields?

Scientists, too, are planning to march on Washington. The scientific consensus on war has been around as long as that on climate change. But what about the popular acceptance? What about the appreciation among grant-writing foundations? What do the labor unions and big environmental groups feel about it? These are the important questions, I’m afraid, even for a scientists’ march.

But I appreciate the scientific method enough to hope my hypothesis is proven wrong.

David Swanson, who has already answered your concerns about impeaching Trump at http://firedonaldtrump.org, is an author, activist, journalist, and radio host. He is director of WorldBeyondWar.org and campaign coordinator for RootsAction.org. Swanson’s books include War Is A Lie. He blogs at DavidSwanson.org and WarIsACrime.org. He hosts Talk Nation Radio. He is a 2015, 2016, 2017 Nobel Peace Prize Nominee.

Help support DavidSwanson.org, WarIsACrime.org, and TalkNationRadio.org by clicking here: http://davidswanson.org/donate.

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Riyadh Lafta, scientist, doctor, activist finally got a US visa to speak at the University of Washington

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When the US 2003 invasion of Iraq was underway, University of Washington (UW), Associate Professor of Global Health Amy Hagopian thought it would be a good idea to bring an academic from Iraq to explain what was actually happening to people in Iraq as a result of that invasion. She worked with other academics at UW, Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, and Johns Hopkins, as well as with community groups who worked with Iraq refugees and the anti-war movement. She spoke with politicians, and wrote letters, and in 2007, it almost seemed as if Lafta would be able to come. He was scheduled to give a talk at UW, but the USA still refused his visa. Canada agreed to give Lafta a visa, and he spoke at Simon Fraser University, with a crowd at UW in Seattle watching the lecture via the internet.

It is likely that one of the main reasons Lafta was denied an USA visa is his 2004  and 2006 Lancet papers  on the mortality of citizens in Iraq as a result of the US invasion. Doing rather dangerous door-to-door surveys, Lafta and colleagues found mortality to be far worse than that reported by the US, which downplayed the effects of war on civilians, and there was a hostile reaction to their papers.

Lafta continued to examine the effects of war on Iraq, and Hagopian continued to work with academic and community members to bring him over. After years of effort, Lafta was awarded a US visa in 2016. On October 27, Lafta gave a talk at the University of Washington.

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There was no pretending in the auditorium that politics was unconnected to science and research: lives are not saved by science or medicine alone. Hagopian and Pramila Jayapal (who is running for Wa State Senator) spoke of politics and war and healthcare, and the possibilities of change. Lafta himself was very clear about the origin of the health problems in Iraq, and about how difficult it would be to improve life for Iraqis. Physicians fear for their lives and most leave the country. With no functioning government, the country is run by militias. He ended his talk with a short film that showed before and after footage of Iraq, once busy streets and markets reduced to rubble. There was a lively question and answer session, and perhaps the sadness and hopelessness of the situation was summed up by Lafta in response to a question about his exceptions of the election on Iraq policy.

He answered simply, “No American President has ever done anything beneficial for Iraq.”

Lafta’s talk has been scheduled for November 3 at Simon Fraser University  in Vancouver, Canada- but as of October 28, his visa application has been refused. He will be speaking at the American Public Health Association meeting in Denver this week.

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October 28, 2016

Riyadh Lafta’s talk can be viewed on YouTube.

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Will scientists at Japanese universities again do military research? Article from The Japan Times about pending Science Council decision

The Japan Times: Science Council of Japan considers overturning long-held opposition to military research

The Japan Times

The nation’s largest and most powerful group of scientists has started discussing lifting its decades- old ban on defense-related research as the government seeks more collaboration with civilians in the development of weapons technology.

The move comes as the Defense Ministry, under the “proactive peace” policy of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, is pushing for the development of dual-use technology by funding research that can be used for both civilian and military purposes.

It also comes on the heels of a report concluded this month by the national defense committee of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which recommended drastically increasing the ministry’s annual budget for dual-use grants to ¥10 billion from the current ¥600 million.

The Science Council of Japan, a group of some 2,000 scientists in fields ranging from engineering to the humanities to the natural sciences, announced last week it has set up a 15-member panel to discuss abandoning its long-held stance against military research.

Established in 1949 as a special organization under the jurisdiction of the prime minister but operating independently of the government, the SCJ has vowed “never to engage in scientific research to be used in war,” based on the bitter lessons of World War II, in which Japanese scientists contributed, directly or indirectly, to the ravages of war at home and abroad.

But in recent years, “it is becoming increasingly difficult to draw a clear line of demarcation between technologies and knowledge for military and civilian uses,” Takashi Onishi, president of SCJ and the president of Toyohashi University of Technology in Aichi Prefecture, wrote in his May 20 proposition to create the panel. “It has also been widely shared that such deepening of ties between academia and defense could threaten the foundations of science.”

page1image20576 page1image20736 page1image20896 page1image21056 The panel, comprising Onishi and 14 other people, including former astronaut Chiaki Mukai and Kyoto University President Juichi Yamagiwa, will discuss whether to amend statements by the council in 1950 and 1967, in which it vowed “never to engage in military research.”

It will also discuss the burgeoning field of dual-use technology.

Known for having spawned such innovations as the Internet and GPS, dual-use technology is common in the West but has long remained low-profile in postwar, pacifist Japan, with many institutions banning such research for fear of re-militarization.

A big turning point came in December 2013, when Abe, after returning to power the year before, had his Cabinet adopt the new National Defense Program Guidelines, said Morihisa Hamada, a volcanologist working at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology and one of scores of scientists opposed to defense research.

The guidelines, in a marked departure from previous versions, spelled out the government’s plan to “actively utilize dual-use technologies in enhanced cooperation with universities and research institutes.”

In fiscal 2015, the Defense Ministry began seeking grant applications from civilian researchers for basic research in dual-use technology. The ¥300 million budget rose to ¥600 million this fiscal year.

Meanwhile, universities across the nation have faced a series of funding cuts from the central government, producing growing ranks of researchers starved for alternative funding.

Hamada said a range of universities and research institutes have conducted joint research with Defense Ministry-affiliated agencies in recent years.

For example, the Ground Systems Research Center, which conducts research on firearms, ammunition, ballistics and blast-resistant structures, vehicles and their fittings, and engineering equipment, has tied up with a range of academic institutions, including Kyushu University, Chiba Institute of Technology and Chiba University in such areas as explosives detection, robotics and engine simulation.

“The reason universities are now wavering is because research budgets have been slashed,” Hamada said.

He believes any research in the name of defense will end up aiding wars and urges concerned researchers to join an ongoing campaign led by Satoru Ikeuchi, an astrophysicist and professor emeritus at Nagoya University, to sign an online petition against military use of science.

While some scientists argue for lifting the research ban under certain conditions, such as using their technology only for defense, not offense, Hamada said such distinctions mean little.

“We should never forget the history of Japan, which waged a war under the name of self-defense,” he said. “All wars start with defense. To ban military research, the most nonconflicting stance to take is refuse any research funds from military institutions, be it the Defense Ministry or agencies tied to the U.S. military.”

The SCJ panel’s discussion will be open to the public, with the first meeting scheduled for June, an official with the group said.

The official added that it may take a year or so to reach a decision. 

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You can leave a comment on line at The Japan Times.
Please consider signing the Japanese anti-militarism declaration.

 

 

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Military recruiting at the 2015 Experimental Biology convention

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Military recruiting at the 2015 Experimental Biology convention.

Curiously placed among the “Publishers” in the Exhibition Hall at the 2015 Experimental Biology Convention in Boston was the Army Medical Recruiting table.

Military recruiters are ubiquitous in high schools (the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 section 9528 stated that military recruiters must be allowed in high schools and must be given student home contact information or the school could lose federal funding.) They are present in colleges and universities, where the targets’ brains are closer to maturity, and where  there is still occasionally protest about their presence.

During and for several decades after the Vietnam War, many scientists refused to take military money for research, but no dissent was shown at this conference. Most passing scientists didn’t seem to notice the table or the 2 soldiers staffing it. But really, how could they miss the incongruity of a gigantic photo of a soldier with gun among the books and journals?

The Army section that was recruiting was the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, in nearby Natick. Its mission is to “Provide solutions to optimize Warfighter health and performance through medical research,” and the vision is “Recognized by the Department of Defense as the trusted leader in medical research for Warfighter health and performance optimization.”

Many partners are listed, from military, universities, and companies. For some, helping with the US’s constant wars might be deliberate and idealogical, but money is probably the main motivator: over half of the discretionary US budget goes to war, even as the NIH and NSF budgets barely move. This ready money has blinded scientists to the implications of taking Department of Defense (DoD) money for their research.

15p R D Pie

 

There are 4 research divisions in USARIEM, and glossy pamphlets were available for each: Biophysics & Biomedical Modeling, Military Nutrition, Military Performance, and Thermal & Mountain Medicine. From traumatic brain injury to improving soldier’s running styles (!), the projects range from the mundane to the tragic, with a presumptive trickle-down benefit to civilians. Or not- do civilians even matter, these days?

We need to think more about war, and science’s (and our own) place in that war. We might have a range of opinions, but we need to be thoughtful and deliberate about participation in something as devastating and all-encompassing as war.

 

 

 

 

 

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World Science Day for Peace and Development is November 10

Peace day

Today, November 10, is World Science Day for Peace and Development!   What a great idea, United Nations!

After World War II, the United Nation adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Article 27, the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications, was declared to be one of those rights.

The 1999 World Conference on Science: Science for the for the Twenty-First Century was held in Budapest and committed itself to using science to benefit mankind. Since then, UNESCO (The United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization) has affirmed that commitment to the role of science in bringing peace and safety to all on November 10 every year. In 2000, and in a  follow-up report in 2002, UNESCO has detailed what the issues are, and how peace and development can be furthered by science.

But why did the UN hedge on its description of peace? Can we meaningfully talk about quality of life for all people, the effects of climate change and poverty, the unforeseen effects, good and bad of technology to happiness of mankind- and not mention the effects of militarization and war? This is especial bizarre because of the role of science and technology in building and selling the weapons of war.

The main report put out by the 1999 conference is the “Declaration of Science and the Use of Scientific Knowledge.”   The report itself acknowledges war, but doesnt come out to say that scientists could work towards ending it.

The Introduction  tiptoes around the issue of war:

“However, scientific and technological progress has also made possible the construction of sophisticated arms that have the potential to destroy life on the entire planet.” And so? There is no response in the report to its own statement.

The Introduction does quote Einstein. “Military applications of science have been of enormous consequence. Therefore, scientists can no longer claim today that their work has nothing to do with social issues. It is interesting to recall the plea made by Albert Einstein back in 1931: ‘concern for humankind itself and its fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavours. . . . Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations’.”  But then, this quote hangs alone, with no connection to the rest of the Introduction.

The follow-up report in 2002  “Harnessing science to society,” makes NO mention of the effects of war and the incompatibility of war with peace.

There is more overt mention in the earlier (1988) resolutions adopted on the reports of the Special Political Committee of the General Assembly:

“43/61. Science and peace

The General Assembly,

Considering also the political and economic decisions have a decisive effect on the direction of scientific research and the use of the results obtained thereby,

Recalling that scientific and technological achievements must be used to advance socio-economic progress and the effective enjoyment of human rights throughout the world,

Considering further that the arms race absorbs a substantial proportion of the scientific talent and financial resources used in related research and development, which, in a more peaceful and secure world, could be used to solve other pressing problems facing mankind…”

But even this needs to be stronger. Neither scientists or politicians should be shy about being absolutely overt about the need to prevent war, and the political and scientific will that will be needed to do this.

It would help to have our leading organizations and journals and professional groups spell it out- we will not have peace without war, and scientists can help bring that peace.

 

 

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Caucus at your professional organization meetings: Don’t waste a chance to build community

     In 2009 the American Public Health Association approved the policy statement, “The Role of Public Health Practitioners, Academics, and Advocates in Relation to Armed Conflict and War.” Despite the known health effects of war, the development of competencies to prevent war has received little attention. Public health’s ethical principles of practice prioritize addressing the fundamen- tal causes of disease and adverse health outcomes. A working group grew out of the American Public Health Association’s Peace Caucus to build upon the 2009 policy by proposing competencies to understand and prevent the political, economic, social, and cultural determinants of war, particularly militarism. The working group recommends that schools of public health and public health organizations incorporate these competencies into professional preparation programs, research, and advocacy. (Am J Public Health. 2014;104:e34–e47. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301778) 

       Within every organization there are specific interests that are shared among smaller groups at meetings. Make that official- or make it unofficial- but gather together to vote, to talk, to suggest resolutions that  guide the organization, to plan projects together.

     The Peace Caucus of the American Public Health Association has been advocating against war and its effect on public health for years. Their latest newsletter is posted below. From that group arose the Primary Prevention of War group, which believes that war, like disease, is best avoided than treated, and has suggested curricula that School of Public Health can use to teach the primary prevention of war (The Role of Public Health in the Prevention of War: Rationale and Competencies. Wrist et al, AJPH 2014:104, e34-e47- for a copy of the paper, email me at kbarkerbtb@gmail.com.)

     

NEWSLETTER________________________________________________________________________________________

Peace Caucus in Official Relations with the American Public Health Association

PEACE CAUCUS

Newsletter • Fall 2014

Primary Prevention of War Group Needs Your Support !

The Public Health Working Group on Primary Prevention of War (PH-PPW) is growing in numbers – and is looking for your support! The group grew out of the APHA annual meeting in 2011, following a Peace Caucus session where
a paper was delivered documenting the general dearth
of coursework available on war and armed conflict within
Schools and Programs of Public Health (SPPHs). Based on a content analysis of curricular offerings of the top 20 SPPHs, the paper demonstrated that the narrow set of courses offered on war tend to be reactive, rather than advancing the concept of primary prevention. This tipped off the creation of this international, interdisciplinary Working Group of scholars and practitioners organizing to promote the primary prevention of war.

The PH-PPW Working Group meets every other month by conference call and has undertaken a number of activities, all aligned with APHA’s Policy Statement, The Role of Public Health Practitioners, Academics and Advocates in Relation to Armed Conflict and War (1). In 2013, the group published its findings on SPPH curriculum in Public Health Reports (2). In 2014, the group published a framework for public health prevention of war in AJPH, including a set of

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www.peacecaucus.org

2014 Victor W. Sidel and Barry Levy Award for Peace

Recipient – Nancy Stoller, PhD

Please join us in honoring Dr. Stoller for her tremendous contribution to peace and health for all Tuesday 6:30 PM
APHA Public Health Awards Reception and Ceremony (Session
322.o)

Film Festival: “Within the Eye of the Storm.” Monday at 6:30 and 8:30 PM

The Medical Care Section is sponsoring showings of “Within the Eye of the Storm” at 6:30 and 8:30 pm (session 3356.1) http://withineyeofstorm.com/. The film runs about 1 hour and tells the real-life story of two men – one Palestinian and one Israeli – each previously dedicated to fighting a faceless other, and each of whose daughters were killed in the conflict, who then committed to work to- gether to humanize the enemy and interrupt the vicious cycle of retaliation. Each showing of this inspiring film will be accompanied by a discussion to which the director, Shelley Hermon, has been invited. Check the program for the location.

Are you a member ?

Peace Caucus Program November 15 – 19, 2014 New Orleans, LA

MONDAY (3171.0) PUBLIC HEALTH, PEACE AND CONFLICT IN THE MIDDLE EAST

10:30 – 12:00 PM NANCY STOLLER, PhD, MODERATOR MCC, 220

10:30 AM — Exploring Social Justice Across Cultures and Professions
Jane Lipscomb, PhD, RN, Corey Shdaimah, PhD, Roni Strier, PhD, Susan Leviton, JD and Jody Olsen, PhD

10:45 AM — Voices Through Walls: How Walls Undermine Human Rights, Humanity, and Peace Steven Gilbert, PhD, DABT and Saherea Bleibleh, PhD

11:00 AM — Politics of Deteriorating Health in Palestine Dima Qato, PharmD, MPH, PhD

11:15 PM — Conflict, Peace, and Public Health in Syria: Addressing the Humanitarian Crisis Noah Gottschalk, Meredith Larson and Sarah Kalloch

11:30 AM — Academic researchers’ and publishers’ role in addressing health issues in Palestine Amy Hagopian, PhD, MPH

11:40 AM — Discussion

Endorsed by: LGBT Caucus of Public Health Professionals, Public Health Nursing, Socialist Caucus CE Credits: Medical (CME), Health Education (CHES), Nursing (CNE), Public Health (CPH) , Masters Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES)

MONDAY (3272.0) RESISTANCE TO WAR AND BUILDING PEACE

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12:30 -2:00 PM MCC, 220

12:30 PM — Health Care Access and Host-Refugee Relations in Uganda Joshua Rodd, MPH, MS, PhD (ABD)

ROBERT GOULD, MD, MODERATOR

12:42 PM — Afghan peace volunteers: Nonviolent resistance to war in Afghanistan Patrick Kennelly, MLS and Emily Malloy, RN, CNM

12:54 PM — From theory to practice: Public health practitioners, academics, and advocates in relation to armed conflict and war

Emily Malloy, RN, CNM, Geraldine Gorman, RN, PhD and Ellen Kennelly, BS, RN, FNP 1:06 PM — Health pathway across all levels after the Gulf War

Charles W. Cange, PhD, MSc 1:18 PM — Using music to create peace

Barry S. Levy, MD, MPH and Victor W. Sidel, MD 1:30pm Discussion

Endorsed by: Public Health Nursing, Socialist Caucus CE Credits: Medical (CME), Health Education (CHES), Nursing (CNE), Public Health (CPH)

TUESDAY (4253.0) Distinguishing health study findings from public policy goals promotes peace, justice and health

12:30 -2:00 PM MCC, 223

Discussants: Madeleine Scammell, D.Sc. and David Tuller, DrPH

MADELEINE SCAMMELL, D.Sc, MODERATOR

12:30 PM —Assessing the public health impacts of industrial farm animal production (IFAP) – Steve Wing, PhD
12:45 PM —Exposure to ionizing radiation from Fukushima: The collision of science and public policy – Robert Gould, MD 1:00pm — War, public health and institutional conflicts of interest – Shelley White, PhD, MPH and Wesley Epplin, MPH 1:15pm Discussion

Endorsed by: Socialist Caucus CE Credits: Medical (CME), Health Education (CHES), Nursing (CNE), Public Health (CPH) , Masters Certified Health Educa- tion Specialist (MCHES)

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Page 2 APHA Peace Caucus Fall 2014

Peace Caucus Program

Patrice Sutton, MPH and Eleni Tolma, PhD, MPH Program Planners

TUESDAY (4352.1) Integrating competencies for the prevention of war into public health curricula: Primary prevention of war work group roundtable

2:30 PM-4:00 PM Moderators: Geraldine Gorman, RN, PhD and Neil Arya, MD MCC, 243

In 2009 the APHA adopted the policy “The Role of Public Health Practitioners, Academics, and Advocates in Relation to Armed conflict and War.” This was one of 35 related policies the APHA has adopted, including those advocating the banning of specific types of weapons, criticizing military budgets, and opposing military recruiting in public schools. Some of those policies, including the 2009 policy, have specifically recommended that schools of public health develop curricula on war and peace and prepare students to address the causes of war. However, research has shown that schools of public health include little about the prevention of war in their curricula. Therefore, in June of 2014 an article to initiate that curriculum development, written by the Working Group on the Primary Prevention of War, an outgrowth of the Peace Caucus of APHA, was published in the American Journal of Public Health. The article delineated 60 competencies in five domains (Militarism, International Peace Work, Peace Advocacy, and Peace Research) for use in developing courses, incorporation into existing courses and conducting workshops to prepare public health workers in the prevention of war. The Working Group disseminated information about the competencies to Deans of schools and programs of public health to help initiate adoption of the competencies and stimulate greater faculty involvement. In addition to the appendices to the AJPH article, the Working Group also has resources available on two Web sites to assist faculty in developing course content. Participants in this roundtable will discuss additional ways to foster the integration of the competencies into the public health education curriculum. Individuals from schools of medicine, nursing, allied health, and the behavioral and social sciences, in addition to faculty and students of schools and programs of public health, are encouraged to participate in the roundtable.

Session Objectives: To identify ways to foster the integration of the competencies about the prevention of war into the public health education curriculum.

Organized by: Peace Caucus Endorsed by: Socialist Caucus

TUESDAY (320.0) Peace Caucus Business MeetinG

6:00 – 7:00 PM MCC, 241

Please note: We will have a brief business meeting beginning at 6 PM and at 6:30 PM we will go to the APHA Awards ceremony in order to celebrate Nancy Stoller as the recipient of the Victor Sidel and Barry Levy Award for Peace.

WEDNESDAY (5133.0) PEACE TO END ALL WAR

10:30 PM-12:00 PM Ann Hirschman, RN-C, FNP, MPH, ModeratoR MCC, 223
10:30am Military events leading to the Christmas truce (July-December 1914): The start of a military revolution

Stephen Trynosky, JD, MPH, EMT, MMAS (cand.)
10:42am
Lasting Legacy of War – Susan Schnall, RN, FACHE
10:54am
Right to Heal – Maggie Martin, MA
11:06amCommunity Based Rehabilitation Model for Individuals with War-Related Disabilities: Could This Work in the United

States? – Carole Baraldi, Ed.D, RN 11:18amLegacy of War: What is it Good For?

Paul Cox, Civil Engineer, Vietnam Veteran, Board Chair Swords to Plowshares

Endorsed by: Public Health Nursing, Socialist Caucus CE Credits: Medical (CME), Health Education (CHES), Nursing (CNE), Public Health (CPH) , Masters Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES)

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Fall 2014 APHA Peace Caucus Page 3

2014 Health Activist Dinner! Sunday November 16, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m

Hoshun Restaurant 1601 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans Buffet Dinner and Cash Bar
(1.2-mile walk or 5-minute taxi from New Orleans Convention Center)
The Health Activist Dinner is a 30+ year tradition that celebrates activism for social justice in the field of health with an event that brings together progressive physician leaders and health activists from across the country. Register at:
http://activistdinner.eventbrite.com $55 (Students: $35)
Registration at the door: $60 (Students: $45)

Sponsoring Organizations: American Medical Student Association, APHA Peace Caucus, APHA Socialist Caucus, Committee of Interns and Residents/SEIU Healthcare, Doctors Council SEIU, Doctors for Global Health, Health- Begins.org, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, National Physicians Alliance, Physicians for a National Health Program, Physicians for Human Rights, Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Project for Nuclear Awareness, and RxDemocracy.

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Tuesday November 18, 8 PM- 12 midnight Occupational Health Section Dance Party!

Fund Raising Social, Party, and Dance All welcome!!!!
Location: The Attic at Lucy’s

Primary Prevention of War Group Needs You!

teaching and learning competencies (3).

The group is also developing website content that will compile faculty resources for teaching on war and health (4). This year, the group has been doing ongoing advocacy targeting the IOM’s recent report “Preventing Psychological Disorders in Service Members and their Families,” which made no mention of preventing war itself. There will be a presentation at APHA on the IOM report, titled “War, public health and institutional conflicts of interest” (#4253, Tuesday 12:30).

The group has also recently reached out to Deans of SPPH to alert them to the group’s work and encourage expanded curricular offerings, as well as to recruit interested faculty to join the group’s efforts. At the upcoming APHA meeting, the PH-PPW will be holding a session “Integrating Competencies for the Prevention of War into Public Health Curricula” (#4352.1, Tuesday 2:30) that will focus on the competency framework recently published in AJPH. This working round table session will engage all attendees
in visioning expanded curricular offerings and academic strategies for promoting the primary prevention of war. We invite all to contribute! For those not attending and interested in learning more about this Working Group, please contact Shelley White at
mlwhite@bc.edu.

1. American Public Health Association. 2009, November 10. The Role of Public Health Practitioners, Academics and Advocates in Relation to Armed Conflict and War. Policy Number 20095. Available on-line at:http://www.apha.org/advocacy/policy/policysearch/default.htm?id=1391 2. White, Shelley K.; Lown, Bernard; and Rohde, Jon E. 2013. “War or Health? Assessing Public Health Education and the Potential for Primary Prevention.” Public Health Reports 128(6). Available on-line at: http://www.publichealthreports.org/issueopen.cfm?articleID=3036
3. Wiist, William; Barker, Kathy; Arya, Neil; Rohde, Jon; Donohoe, Martin; White, Shelley; Lubens, Pauline; Gorman, Gerry; Hagopian, Amy. 2014. “The Role of Public Health in the Prevention of War: Rationale and Competencies.”American Journal of Public Health 104(6): e34-e47. Available on-line at: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301778
4. Faculty Resources for Teaching War and Public Health. Available at: http://phsj.org/war-and-peace/

Fall 2014 APHA Peace Caucus Page 4

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